Satellite Loops of Tropical Cyclones

These loops were all created by me, and anyone may feel free to link to or use them, but I'd appreciate that credit is given (Brian McNoldy, Univ of Miami).
The current Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Series is capable of producing 1-km resolution visible images every minute, resulting in an immense dataset which can be used to study convective cloud tops as well as transient low-level cloud swirls in the eye. Simple barotropic computer models have shown that vorticity redistribution in the core of a TC can result in the formation of local vorticity maxima, or mesovortices. The models have also suggested that this process is responsible for polygonal eyewalls and in some instances, rapid intensification. Satellite imagery has proven valuable in the validation of the model results.

View a poster (AGU Fall Meeting, Dec 2000) entitled "A Preliminary Observational Study of Hurricane Eyewall Mesovortices" by B. D. McNoldy and T. H. Vonder Haar.

View a paper (Monthly Weather Review, Dec 2002) entitled "Vortical Swirls in Hurricane Eye Clouds" by J. P. Kossin, B. D. McNoldy, and W. H. Schubert.

View a paper (Monthly Weather Review, Feb 2003) entitled "A Classification of Binary Tropical-cyclone-like Vortex Interactions" by R. Prieto, B. D. McNoldy, S. R. Fulton, and W. H. Schubert.

View a paper (Bulletin of the Amer. Met. Soc., Nov 2004) entitled "Triple Eyewall in Hurricane Juliette" by B. D. McNoldy.

View a paper (Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Jan 2006) entitled "Rapid Filamentation Zones in Intense Tropical Cyclones" by C. M. Rozoff, W. H. Schubert, B. D. McNoldy, and J. P. Kossin.


Created and maintained by Brian McNoldy

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